favoritism

Oh gosh, I HATE this story. Hate.Hate.HATE it! Here we go again with the “parents like one child more than another” debate. In his book, The Sibling Effect, author Jeffrey Kluger, says 95 percent of parents have a favorite child and the other 5 percent are lying. Oh yeah?

Cole stopped mid-chew to listen to Today Show host Ann Curry breathlessly read the tease. My baby boy has always maintained that Casey is my favorite child, especially after he’s done something that results in me correcting his bad behavior. Casey, though she’s never said so, might feel this as well. It reminds me a bit of when I was a news anchor and I’d get calls from Republicans and Democrats during elections, accusing me of supporting the other side, sure of it because of the barely perceptible but definite “gleam in your eye” when talking about the other side.

I’ve said it before I’ll say it again, I don’t think this is a healthy thing to be talking about outside of a therapist’s office yet in this day and age of over-sharing, people seem quite comfortable going against the most basic form of common sense and spilling their guts, without regard for how it’s going to be received.

Do I have a favorite child? Yes. And the next day, that kid will be dangerously close to being put out of the house and the other one will take the crown. I can say with near certainty that happens evenly.

Perhaps the thing that pisses me off so badly about this is Kluger’s assertion that he knows what is going on in my head, home and heart. I can assure him (not that he asked me) that it is not because it is anathema to me; it’s just not true. And judging by the results of the poll on the MSNBC page, most people just aren’t feeling his way of thinking either.

So let’s debate. Do you have a favorite child or did you grow up in a home where a brother or sister was favored? Do you think most parents have a favorite child but just can’t bring themselves to admit it? Lemme hear ya!